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Bremerton | Port Orchard (360) 377-2233

Tuesday, 14 May 2024 00:00

Plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the plantar fascia, often affects individuals between 40-60 years old. This is due to factors like excessive pronation, high arches, or prolonged standing that affect the broad band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot. One of the main symptoms of plantar fasciitis is sharp heel pain, particularly in the morning or after rest, which can radiate along the foot's arch. Initial management of plantar fasciitis may involve reducing inflammation and pain by moderating activity, taking certain pain relievers, and wearing properly fitting shoes. A podiatrist can assess factors like foot structure, gait abnormalities, and muscle imbalances that may contribute to the condition. Physiotherapy with stretching and strengthening exercises also may be implemented. A podiatrist may recommend advanced treatments like corticosteroid injections for persistent symptoms. In severe cases, podiatric surgical options, such as plantar fasciotomy, may be considered. It is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist, who can conduct a thorough exam and suggest the best treatment options for plantar fasciitis discomfort. 

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact one of our doctors  from Kitsap Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bremerton and Port Orchard, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Sunday, 12 May 2024 00:00

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Tuesday, 07 May 2024 00:00

 

Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, affects millions of individuals in the United States. It is caused by reduced blood flow due to plaque buildup in peripheral arteries. PAD often targets the lower extremities, seriously affecting the legs and feet. A common indicator of peripheral artery disease is intermittent muscle pain in the lower legs during activity that subsides with rest. Other signs include diminished toenail and leg hair growth, temperature disparities between feet and non-healing wounds. Treatment from a podiatrist is essential for alleviating symptoms and preventing further complications. Podiatrists can offer various treatment options for PAD, including custom orthotic devices and footwear modifications, and in severe cases, surgical intervention. Additionally, lifestyle adjustments, such as smoking cessation and managing underlying conditions like hypertension, are essential in PAD management. Early intervention not only improves quality of life but also reduces the risk of severe complications associated with PAD. If you experience symptoms of peripheral artery disease that is affecting your lower legs and feet, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our doctors from Kitsap Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bremerton and Port Orchard, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 30 April 2024 00:00

Blisters on the feet can be an unwelcome nuisance, often causing discomfort and hindering mobility. These fluid-filled sacs typically form in response to friction or repetitive rubbing against the skin. When excessive pressure or irritation occurs, the outer layer of the skin separates from the underlying tissue, creating a protective bubble filled with fluid. Common culprits behind blister formation include wearing ill-fitting shoes, prolonged periods of walking or running, and friction caused by sweaty or damp conditions. Additionally, certain activities, such as hiking or wearing new shoes without proper breaking in, can increase the likelihood of developing blisters. Individuals with foot deformities or abnormalities may also be more prone to blister formation due to uneven pressure distribution. If you have a blister on your foot that has become infected, it is suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can safely treat it and provide effective prevention techniques for future knowledge.

Blisters may appear as a single bubble or in a cluster. They can cause a lot of pain and may be filled with pus, blood, or watery serum. If your feet are hurting, contact one of our doctors of Kitsap Foot & Ankle Clinic. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters are often the result of friction. This happens due to the constant rubbing from shoes, which can lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

Symptoms

(Blister symptoms may vary depending on what is causing them)

  • Bubble of skin filled with fluid
  • Redness
  • Moderate to severe pain
  • Itching

Prevention & Treatment

In order to prevent blisters, you should be sure to wear comfortable shoes with socks that cushion your feet and absorb sweat. Breaking a blister open may increase your chances of developing an infection. However, if your blister breaks, you should wash the area with soap and water immediately and then apply a bandage to the affected area. If your blisters cause severe pain it is important that you call your podiatrist right away.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Bremerton and Port Orchard, WA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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